‘Sign, Sign, Everywhere A Sign’

Religion, magic, art, and language all use symbols to convey, conceal, and convolute. And while an individual may think that he/or she knows the explicit meaning of a familiar symbol, say, for example, the Christian cross, that same person might be surprised to learn that the cross is an ancient pagan symbol that predates Christianity. Used as an instrument of knowledge, symbols can be powerful mediums of expression. As such, a symbol must not simply equate; it must articulate a reality that exists beyond mere words. For this reason, the study of symbols often becomes a quest into the metaphysical realm.

In The Templar’s Code, symbols are used throughout the plot. To convey, conceal, and convolute
. . . Here’s a small sampling:

OctogramThe eight-pointed Octogram is the ancient symbol of a square interlaced within another square. It represents, in the macrocosm, cosmic harmony; and in the microcosm, the personal achievement of balance. Within the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is known as ‘the Creator’s star’ because the world was created in seven days, followed by the eighth day, one of blessed regeneration. A familiar symbol in Islamic art, the eight-pointed star, or khatim sulayman, reflects the desire to understand the Creation. As the Prophet Mohammad so aptly articulated: ‘Praise God the creator who has bestowed upon Man the power to discover the significance of numbers’.

Jerusalem Cross

BeauséantThe Beauséant was the battle standard of the medieval Knights Templar. Comprised of three armorial colors – black, white, and red – this simple design is laden with complex meaning. At first glance, it represents the spiritual transformation that each man must undertake; black symbolic of the evil inherent in the material world and the color white symbolic of the purity of God’s divine love. The cross is the meeting point between the material and the spiritual, the color red representing the fire of that divine love. For this reason, each Knights Templar wore a red cross pattée on the left side of his surcoat, directly over the heart. In battle, the Beauséant was so vitally important that ten specially chosen knights ensured that the standard remained aloft. A twelfth century pilgrim to the Holy Land wrote: ‘The Templars are most excellent soldiers . . . and when they go to war a standard is borne before them. Their first attack is the most terrible. In going, they are the first. In returning – the last.’

Jerusalem Cross

Enochian AlphabetThe Enochian Alphabet was created in the 16th century by Dr. John Dee, a famous English magician and official astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I. If Dee’s account of the alphabet’s origin is to be believed, the letters were transmitted to him by celestial angels. Indeed, the alphabet is unique and bears no resemblance to any other known script. Which enabled Dee, who was also Queen Elizabeth’s premier spy, to use this one-of-a-kind lettering system to great advantage, guaranteeing the secrecy of his missives. Like Hebrew, the Enochian script is read right to left. In regards to the individual letters, according to an angelic ‘conversation’ that Dr. Dee had with the Angel, ‘These letters represent the creation of man, and therefore they must be in proportion. They represent the workmanship wherewithal the soul of man was made like unto his creator.’

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WadjetThe Wadjet is the ancient Egyptian eye symbol. The left eye, known as the Eye of Thoth, symbolizes the moon, while the right eye, the Eye of Ra, symbolizes the sun. Because it is able to perceive light, the eye, or wadjet, represents man’s spiritual journey within the material plane. Not only was the wadjet used as a magical symbol on talismans and amulets, it was also used as a hieroglyph. The Egyptians referred to hieroglyphs as ‘the speech of the gods.’ Interestingly, there are seven different hieroglyphs that incorporate the eye symbol. Far from being a passive ocular organ, the wadjet was considered a proactive symbol, one capable of ushering forth great change, as well as the enlightenment that comes with knowledge.

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AnkhThe Ankh, also known as ‘the key of the Nile,’ represents the power to give life. The exact origins of the symbol are still very much a mystery. In many tomb renderings, the Egyptian gods and goddesses of the afterworld are depicted carrying an ankh by its loop, conferring the gift of eternal life onto a deceased’s mummy. The ankh was also a popular amulet; mirrors of beaten metal were shaped into ankhs, allowing the possessor a glimpse into the next world. Like the wadjet, the ankh was used as a hieroglyph, symbolizing the sexual union between male and female.

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All-Seeing EyeThe All-Seeing Eye, also known as the Eye of Providence, is usually depicted surrounded by rays of light. Representing the divine eye of God watching over the Creation, it is the most well-known symbol in Freemason iconography, a version of which appears on the back of the U.S. one dollar bill. Although Freemasons recognize and revere the Creator, whom they refer to as ‘the Great Architect of the world,’ they have, nonetheless, been officially condemned by the Roman Catholic Church for being devotees of a pagan religion.

Jerusalem Cross